This #WomensHistoryMonth, explore the stories of nine pioneering women who have inspired members of Museum staff in our blog post. Marguerite Naville (1852–1930) was a Swiss Egyptologist. Naville copied and inked inscriptions, reliefs and monuments, developing new techniques that reflected both the state of a monument and its conservation. This is her illustration of two […]

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Our newly announced #FemininePowerExhibition will take a cross-cultural look at the representation of female spiritual beings over the last 5,000 years. Discover the role that goddesses, demons, witches and other spiritual beings have played – and continue to play – in shaping our understanding of the world. Through a wide range of objects, and with […]

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‘How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.’ British poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning was born #OnThisDay in 1806. Barrett Browning’s poetry was hugely influential during the 19th century, and this line is from her best-known work, ‘Sonnets from the Portuguese’, a collection of love sonnets dedicated to her husband Robert Browning. This portrait […]

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These enchanting enamelled objects were made by Susanne de Court – one of only two recorded female enamel painters in Limoges, France around 1600. The pale flesh tints, rich turquoises and purples of these enchanting scenes are typical of de Court’s work – zoom in to see the detail ✨ You can see some of […]

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📚 What's on your reading list this #WorldBookDay? These beautiful objects are intricate book covers, made in the early 1500s ✨ Crafted from silver, they once decorated the Book of Epistles and the Book of Gospels on the altar of the Minster in Ulm, Germany. 📖 From children’s classics to imaginative adventure stories, myths, legends […]

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Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ was illustrated by Sir John Tenniel, who was born #OnThisDay in 1820. He created 92 weird and whimsical drawings for the first ‘Alice’ book, and its sequel ‘Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There’ – zoom in to see the detail in these printed versions 🌹⏱🐰♟ 🛍 […]

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Our touring exhibition ‘Desire, love, identity: exploring LGBTQ histories’ visited five UK venues over its recent tour. Each added objects from their own collections and communities to the show, highlighting local LGBTQ histories and connections. These objects were added at Norfolk and Norwich Millennium Library – they focus on Justin Fashanu, who began his football […]

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How was Stonehenge built? The ancient stone circle is shrouded in layers of speculation and folklore, but in our latest blog, archaeologist Mike Pitts looks at the evidence and talks you through the ‘how’ of Stonehenge. Find out how the huge stones arrived at Salisbury Plain from different parts of Britain and how they were […]

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The sound of this silver lyre rung out in Mesopotamia over 4,500 years ago 🎶 The stringed instrument is nearly one metre tall and one metre long, and would have been played standing up. You can see how a similar lyre was played – and the scale of the instrument – in this scene depicted […]

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